5 New Habits I Made in Korea

I was so curious before I came what Korea was going to be like and how I would adapt to it so I thought I would share a few little Korean habits I have picked up while here.

  1. I say “maybe” a lot now. Koreans will often add “maybe” to statements that are actually quite declarative. “Maybe, it is very dangerous to go there.” It seems to be something that makes their sentence politer and I’ve found myself saying “maybe” and “I think” more as well.
  2. I eat rice all the time. It feels weird if I don’t have rice for a while, and the rice here is really good! It’s always perfectly sticky for chopsticks but not too sticky and they have so many different kinds. I love them all.IMG_5707.jpg
  3. I bring the little tissues in my purse everywhere. Toilet paper may or may not be in any given public bathroom and even if it is, it may not be in the stall. It’s always safest to have a cute little packet of tissues for any occasion. Koreans also have the wet wipes that are often used instead of napkins and I have a pack of those as well. (It even has an adorable little kakao friend on the packet, how cute /Korean is that?)
  4. I use two hands to give things. Money, drinks, papers, it’s more polite here if you use both hands.  Not everything needs to be done this way. If one of your hands is full or it’s a less formal situation it’s fine but it is a pretty polite thing to do. Even shaking hands should be done with two hands. It’s fun seeing peoples’ faces light up when I say “Bangabsumnida!” And shake their hand politely.

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    Taking drinks like this with two hands might be overly polite for the situation but the people at the cafe still seem to appreciate it! 😀

  5. I bow all the time. You probably saw this one coming! And I’ll be completely honest with you, I don’t really know exactly when to bow all the time but I figure trying can’t hurt and I try to watch when other do it around me. 

There are so many other little things like taking of shoes at school/restaurants, paying more attention to people’s age, drinking with my head turned away from people who are older than me, hiking more, going to café’s more… I freaking love Korea and can’t wait to see what else I learn while I am here!

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How to Get Better at Korean

I’m going to say right now that this is entirely from personal experience. I studied Korean two months before coming here just practicing simple words… their word for hello took me a long time to master and they had a different alphabet. Then applying got too busy and I stopped studying and just showed up in this country with the ability to read barely read their alphabet and the words “hello/thank you” in my vocabulary.

It has been two months and two days and I have now had multiple mini conversations that were entirely in Korean, I am able to sometimes understand the small talk of my students as they all walk by chatting away. I have told my Korean friends that they need to give me a month and a half and I will speak with them entirely in Korean for a whole conversation. I was told that it was possible to learn a language in three months so that has been my goal. Three months… four months if I push it. That means the goal is December…

While it is not necessary for an English teacher to speak any Korean here (especially in bigger cities), I think it is the key to making friends here, having good relationship with co-workers, making life easier, and conquering one of the biggest personal goals I have had.

What’s my plan of attack? How have I been doing it so far?

  1. HelloTalk. Pros: You can meet and speak with Koreans wherever you are in the world and begin practicing immediately. I have not only practiced my Korean daily with some people there but have also asked many cultural questions especially when I first got here. One of my friends spent a while trying to help me get my hot water set up. So kind and very appreciated!! Another pro: There is a voice record option so you can get some great feedback! This has really made a huge difference with pronunciation! Koreans comment on it all the time which is super encouraging! Another pro: You make some amazing friends. I have met up with a couple people from the app now and I am so grateful to know them. They are not only great teachers but great people and we have traveled Korea together! Obviously, use common sense.. which brings us to the cons.. Cons: There can be creepers. Sometimes you just have to block or report them. Some of my friends refuse to call it a language app and use it just like Tinder… I like to call it a multipurpose app. Meet locals. Personally, I’m not looking to get a boyfriend from it, I just really want fluency in the next month… but one of my friends got it for the same reason and she is now dating a great Korean guy… so there’s that. Con: It can be overwhelming. I eventually deleted it because I already had so many friends (many of whom actually like really close to me here in Geoje!) and I just can’t keep starting new conversations. It can take up a lot of space on your phone. But if you are just getting started, don’t let that stop you. It’s the perfect way to get started!
  2. Learn Kpop. Pros: I learn so much better if I am singing, it just sticks so much better. And Kpop is known for being pretty catchy so it’s the perfect mix. I learn quickly and painlessly and enjoy singing so it’s a win win win! Pro: You learn grammar structures on accident. I learned a couple songs and you can’t help but start to notice patterns and then all of a sudden it clicks and then you hear your co-teachers use the same pattern and your brain explodes! Without anyone teaching you any painful grammar rules you learned a new part of the language! Pros: You would be surprised at how applicable the vocabulary is to real life. At first I was a little sheepish… I am learning phrases like “I miss you,” “All my love,” “Our love is like a firework”… I’m not sure how often I will be using any of those with my co-teachers… but then suddenly my co-teacher says something about “all classes” and I realize I know the word all… and people talk about the firework festival and I know what they are talking about! One more pro: It helps you connect with your students like you wouldn’t believe! Cons… Not any real cons to this route unless you dislike Kpop or hate singing.
  3. Talk to me in Korea (TTMIK): Pros: FREE. Well, everything I have been talking about is free but this is like free courses, very official and clear. I love the teachers and how they break each lecture into roughly 20 minutes portions and repeat often. Clear easy lessons that you will learn from. While you can get everything online I did end up buying a couple of their books because they were they best Korean language learning books I could find and I am so glad I decided to. I’ve definitely used them a lot and it’s made a difference. Cons: Some people say that it is boring… which I don’t really understand because I think the teachers are pretty entertaining but I know its all personal taste. Speaking of personal taste… have you seen that drama? Which brings me to my next point:
  4. Watch Kdramas: Pros: You can listen for an extended period of time and its fun. Turn of the subtitles to make it harder. While I haven’t watched very many, this has introduced me to some expressions that don’t really have equivalents in English are have been really helpful to know. It can also be helpful to teaching intonation… careful though! That’s also a Con: You don’t want to be speaking like a melodramatic high school girl who has gotten her heart broken because her secret wealthy boyfriend is struggling to breakup with his finance… Once you come to Korea, dramas aren’t really quite as necessary. Just listen to everyone around you.
  5. Always be Trying: Pros: You will get better. If you are always trying to talk on your language app, or at the grocery store, or to your co-workers, you are guaranteed to get better. If you google translate what all your groceries and appliance buttons say, you will eventually start to catch on. If you try to read as much Korean as you can, you will eventually start to get faster. If you want to be fluent, this is guaranteed to work. Cons: This is one of the most exhausting things you can do. It can be exhausting on its own but doing it will adapting to a new way of life and a new job can be one of the most strenuous activities you can do. I slept more when I first got to Korea from sheer fatigue every night and I didn’t even do it all day, just practiced a little at a time. One more con: You are almost guaranteed to offend somebody or make some socially awkward mistake just because you don’t know any better. Either you say the word itself wrong or you don’t realize that you can’t ask that sort of question to that sort of person because of the culture. So far, I’ve only been mildly rude by accident so I’m hoping it doesn’t get much worse than that! But despite these cons, this is the way that is guaranteed to work!

So there it is! My method up till now and how I am hoping to be fluent in three months… Will it happen? I will keep you posted!

10 of my Favorite Things about Korea

I’ve been living in Korea for about a month and a half now. So much time has already flown by! So I wanted to share a couple things I really love about Korea and living on my island of Geoje-do. Not the big general things like the culture and the language (which are totally awesome!), but the really personal details that I love so much about my life here.

  1. I love the little filled fishes that ajuma’s make here on the street corners. These mini deserts seem to be the cross between a donut and a waffle. I really like the red bean paste and you can get them filled with that or filled with a lemon cream-delicious! img_5468
  2. I really like my Etude House tea drop eye highlighters. I got two because they were so cheap and I had been wanting to get these for so long. I absolutely the sparkly big eye asian look. As much as I liked my usual dark slightly smokey eyed look before I came here, wearing something sparkly and bright is so me that it makes me happy every time I put it on!

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    I’m also pretty excited in this picture because of the sangria I found!

  3. I love the little bread shop on the corner by the department store in my neighborhood. It is filled with breads that are filled with creams and pastes and I enjoy them all (I know because I’ve tried them all). There is a strawberry cream filled one and a red bean paste filled burnt rice bread which are so weird and delicious. And honestly, my favorite thing about this store is the lady who works there. She is always so kind and so even when I am not getting bread I’ll be sure to wave at her through the large glass windows.

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    These is a burnt rice bun with red bean filling-perfect breakfast!

  4. I love the statue of Mary outside the little Catholic Church that I found. I think it’s cool that no matter how tiny and squished in the churches are in Korea, every one I have seen have a lovely Marian Grotto.
  5. I love leaving my toothbrush at school. Koreans are super big into toothbrushing which I think is great! That way you don’t have to stress about eating a really spicy flavorful meal because you know every teacher and student is going to rush to the sink right after and take their toothbrush from its spot on their shelf and brush their teeth. And it makes the school feel way more like home to me.
  6. I love the bus stop by my main school. It’s right on the edge of the sea and the horizon is filled with purpleish blue islands fading away into the distance. Sunny or gray, it is absolutely amazing and I feel so blessed every time I walk to the bus from school. There is a long dock from the school to the bus stop so I get to walk over the sea every time I work at the main school and I always have to take a moment to just drink it in. So beautiful. IMG_5695.JPG
  7. I really like the KakaoTalk friend Muzi. So KakaoTalk (Korea’s talk app) has all these little characters that apparently have different and personalities, way more options that the generic smiley faces I’m used to adding to texts! So Muzi is my favorite little guy. He is technically an emoticon of an adventurous, fun-loving radish wearing a bunny suit but he looks like a cute little bunny to me and I like the little guy! I definitely use that emoji most when texting and I actually just got a Muzi toothbrush and notebook. Just too cute! mujiLike look at that adventurous little radish!
  8. I love eating super hot and spicy Ddokbboki while standing at the street food counter. I have always been ravenously hungry when I get it but it’s so amazing every time! It’s sweet and spicy (like most things here) and I love the chewy texture of the noodle things in the sauce. Eventually I’ll learn to make it myself but its always cheap to just buy on the way home, and I like the experience of standing on a street corner and eating it too!

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    That’s a whole lot of delicious you are looking at!

  9. I love being called “Teacher” in tiny Korean accented voices! My students are all adorable and I am so grateful to be at the schools that I am at.
  10. And I love white Konglish Sweaters! Why white? It’s just a personal preference of mine at the moment, but what I really love is when they have large English words on them that sometimes make sense and sometimes make no sense at all. Its just so refreshing coming from an English speaking country where we have asian characters printed on stuff to see people who can’t speak the language sporting big roman letters on their clothes. I don’t know why I love wearing them so much but they make me so happy. I just bought a sweater that says “Whatever you do” scrawled across the front which is fine but on the sleeve it also says “The city of Uk Popular” which makes me laugh every time!

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    This one even came with the little black skirt!

There you have it: a glimpse into some of the little things I love so much! Words cannot fully express how happy I am to be here! To all my friends and family back home, thank you so much for all the support and helping make this dream a reality. I love you all so very very much!