How to Visit Seoul with Almost no Money

Let me give you the scenario:

I have only been in Korea for a few weeks and am super eager to explore.

I learn that Chuseok (one of the two main Korean holidays) gives us an extra long weekend and plenty of travel time.

I have not been paid yet at this point and don’t have anything in my Korean bank account… and very little in my wallet.

I wanted to see Seoul which is on the other side of Korea from where I live…

The Solution:

Go to Seoul the ridiculously cheap way!

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Here’s me and my buddy Ryan

I am here to tell you that it is possible to travel to Seoul for less than $300 and have an out-of-this-world-awesome time! Here are 5 tips (heavily sprinkled with anecdotal details):

  1. Take the cheap train! We took the slow overnight train. So we left late Tuesday (11pm) and got to Seoul around 4:30am. Was this conducive to healthy sleep schedule? No. Was it a blast? Let me answer that question by saying there were lots of snacks, giggles, and singing in the mini Norebang involved. It was a fantastic choice!! If I had the money, I think the KTX (their fast train) would be worth it because its so much faster but I was able to get a ticket for only $28! So less then $60 round trip! It just takes a little of hide and seek to find the good deals.

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    Laughing, Talking, Singing and Snapping Friends when I should have been sleeping…

  2. Use Airbnb to find a super cheap place to stay! I paid $55 dollars for three nights. I think this was the place…  I love hostels because they are so cheap and you often meet some pretty cool people! I met some cool people from Australia, Brazil, Ireland, Mexico, China and a couple of other places that I forgot. Some of them even joined our group for sight seeing a couple of days!
  3. Find the free stuff!! Because we went during such a big holiday some of the palaces were letting people in for free. Gyeongbukgung Palace was absolutely beautiful with gorgeous grounds stretching out in every direction. The detail of the paintings were stunning and it was sandwiched between hazy green mountains and silvery skyscrapers. Classic Korea. This was just one thing but there are so many classes, events and random free stuff in Seoul that its worth doing a little research and finding enough so you can help.
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    Feeling so much like a Princess walking around this palace!

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    How is Korea always so beautiful??

  4. Eat the street food! It’s delicious so I would want to anyways but it’s also pretty cheap and depending on what you get can be super filling! Walking through Hongdae  at night with freshly made hot food with all the lights and live music… one of my favorite things! Hongdae is also amazing for the cafes! We went to a raccoon cafe (less then $2 total if you get the cheapest drink!) here and it was a couple hours of pure awesome! The furry little creatures kept going for people’s drinks and phones, it was hilarious! The energy in Hongdae is amazing and the nightlife is crazy awesome!
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    Shopping a little at Hongdae… I could spend a whole week in this part of town and never get bored…

  6. And something I have mentioned throughout this post-travel with friends. I traveled with a group I had met through EPIK Orientation and they are a group of fantastic human beings! We actually ran into lots of EPIK teacher there so it got to be quite the party! Traveling in a group like this not only makes the trip lots of fun but also let’s you split all the costs (for room, food, taxis etc!). On top of that, the people in your group may have connections (“I have this one friend we can stay with”) or may know about more stuff that slipped through your research (Thanks to all my friends who brought me along for the free events!!)
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    Amazing people right here:)

What else did we do? We went to the Eye Trick Museum ($14) and spent a whole morning laughing and taking ridiculous pictures. IMG_5203.jpgAnd we ate food in Itewon (that’s the foreign section of Seoul so it’s filled with foods we hadn’t seen in a while) like Burritos!! It was exciting!!IMG_5038.jpg

And made so many memories. This trip was a fantastic decision and I will definitely be back.

Want to see a clip of our time there? Check it out! 

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Seven Things I’ve Learned Living Seven days in Korea

Ok, for those seven days I’m counting the days I have lived on Geoje Island. I was staying in Busan for about a week before that but a week ago today I moved in and really made Korea my home.

  1. I’ve learned just how beautiful Korea can be. Of course, a girl can dream of being a mermaid and living next to the sea but how often is it real life? How often to you lesson plan in your office with the wind rolling off the ocean and through your windows? How often do you eat lunch break looking at the glitter of the sea? How often do you get to ride the bus through sleepy towns half buried in the deep green of the mountains? Every day, is the answer. Every day when you live in Geoje.
  2. On a totally different note, I learned that I like squatter toilets as much as I thought I would which is not very much at all. I was told that they would be here but I was hoping I would be able to avoid them somehow. No such luck.
  3. I learned it’s ok not to use chopsticks sometimes. I’ve used chopsticks in America due to a partly Asian background, but I still was a little worried coming here and trying to eat with people who have used chopsticks daily their whole lives. My co-workers kindly put my worries by constantly being surprised at how I am “able to eat well” and “use chopsticks like a Korean.” Yay, I can eat food here!!! But watching everyone around me… I think I over compensate sometime and use chopsticks for things that don’t have to be. Next week, I will be that much better at really eating like a Korean.
  4. While we are on the topic of food, I have learned that Korean food is every bit as delicious as I hoped it would be. School lunches are like going out to eat every day. I think I’ve been very spoiled with my schools because the food is always delicious. I was a little sad that I didn’t take a picture of today’s meal which was Octopus-Tofu soup, Bibimbop (which is a massive pile of veggies, meat, and rice), kimchi, a kiwi, and caramelized-honey-drizzled sweet potatoes with walnuts. It was ridiculously delicious and I was stuffed afterwards. Should have taken a picture but when you’re starving and they give you a meal like that? It’s just time to dive right in.
  5. I’ve learned that Koreans actually do have amazing skin and hair. Seriously, you know how in movies even the random people walking down the street look great and it’s kind of hilarious because it’s not realistic? Korea is that type of hilarious. I love it!
  6. I learned that Koreans are very eco-friendly and it’s been a hard lesson. The first couple of days, I couldn’t figure out how to turn on the hot water or the stove because they like to use as little energy as possible and you have to turn those things on just before you are about to use them. I thought my apartment was broken but it took too much emotional energy to ask my co-workers about it when there so many other things that I didn’t understand and had to ask them about. But then some of my fellow teacher friends began venting about the struggle to figure it out and I began to wonder if I tried hard enough, if I could get it to work. Google to the rescue! And some Korean friends from my HelloTalk app. (A super handy app where you can talk with people from all over the world to practice languages! I’ve found a lot of Koreans in Geoje who want to practice English and have kindly helped me practice Korean!) They talked me through Korean ways which was super helpful! Koreans don’t just leave stuff like that on, the way we do in America. There are buttons to press and levers to turn so that you can shut it off afterwards and conserve energy.
  7. And, finally, I’ve learned a lesson that I think is learned whenever you travel, especially alone. You learn the goodness of mankind. I know that there are terrible people in the world but I feel that, judging from the stories that I’ve heard and the stories I’ve experienced, travel also shows us the kindness humanity still has around us. The kind ladies at the bus stop that point the direction to go. The amazing welcoming spirit of all my co-workers who know I can’t understand their language but still will reach out to include me. Sometimes the struggle and the hard moments are what it takes to find those good people and remember the kindness of strangers.

There you have it, seven of the things I’ve learned living here on the island. Can you believe that ten days ago, I had no idea that Geoje even existed? How does a place go from non-existent to deep-in-your-heart in the span of seven days? And its only been seven days, what adventures lie ahead?

Ok, and if you want to read more about Geoje Island, here is another blog post (with pictures!) which talked beautifully about it and gave me lots of great ideas of future things to see!